Fiber-optic cable storage dos and don’ts addressed in technical paper

Document from Hubbell asks, and answers, ‘Fiber storage – are you doing it wrong?’

What's wrong with storing outside-plant fiber-optic cable like this? Plenty, according to a technical paper authored by Hubbell Power Systems.
What's wrong with storing outside-plant fiber-optic cable like this? Plenty, according to a technical paper authored by Hubbell Power Systems.

A technical paper authored by Hubbell Power Systems and available from Cabling Installation & Maintenance addresses the proper storage of fiber-optic cable used in outside-plant installations. Titled “Fiber Storage – Are You Doing It Wrong?” the two-page paper offers dos and don’ts for designers, cabling installers, and network managers who deal with pole-to-pole cable runs.

It gives heads-up warnings about the potentially harmful consequences of less-than-optimum storage techniques. Specifically, the paper discusses how storage methods can effect, or cause, cable twisting, cable pinching, cable memory, cable stress, bend radius, and aesthetics. Additionally, it advises readers to consider that in all likelihood, stored cable will need to be accessed at some time in order to be spliced. It points out as well that cable manufacturers likely approve some storage methods but not others.

The document puts forth the image included on this page as an example of a “don’t.” It explains that such a storage apparatus is used in some applications and, “At first glance, this product seems to justify itself by essentially providing a storage area, as opposed to simply ‘looping’ cable on a line.” Hubbell then cautions: “However, this method leaves the cable exposed and potentially hazardous, further costing an exorbitant amount in repair and lost service time.”

The technical paper is available for free to anyone who provides registration information. You can download the paper here.

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