Looking from 100/400G toward Terabit networking line cards

Upcoming technical presentation will discuss how line cards aggregate bandwidths from 100 to 400 Gbps to 1 Terabit per second (Tbps) will need to evolve and rely heavily on high-speed serial interface technology

Jun 6th, 2013

MoSys (NASDAQ: MOSY), a supplier of semiconductors for enabling fast, intelligent data access for network and communications systems, will be presenting at The Linley Group’s Linley Tech Carrier Conference 2013 in Santa Clara, CA. In his presentation, “Evolving Toward 1Tbps Line Cards,” MoSys’ VP of technology innovation and system applications, Michael Miller, will discuss how line cards that target aggregate bandwidths from 100 to 400 Gigabits per second (Gbps) to 1 Terabit per second (Tbps) will need to evolve and rely heavily on high-speed serial interface technology in order to achieve the necessary data throughput and packet header processing memory access rate.

See:400G : Why now?

The Linley Tech Carrier Conference is a two-day, single-track event delivering in-depth information from industry leaders focused on system design for wired and wireless infrastructure, including Carrier Ethernet, optical transport, broadband infrastructure and wireless base stations.The conference will open with a presentation from The Linley Group, highlighting carrier equipment design trends and providing context for later presentations. The remainder of the program will include subjects ranging from access designs to 100G Ethernet designs. Relevant chips discussed will include network processors (NPUs), FPGAs, wireless-baseband processors, control-plane processors, PHYs and optical-transport devices.

The Linley Tech Carrier Conference takes place June 12-13, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara. The conference is intended for system designers, carriers, network service providers, network equipment vendors, OEM/ODMs, press and the financial community. Attendance is free to qualified attendees who register by June 6, 2013.

More: Looking beyond 100G toward 400G standardization

More in Standards