Thieves use Google Earth to steal copper cabling

The ubiquitous, freely accessible Google Earth satellite pictorial application was used by thieves to target copper cabling along the side of UK railway lines in a theft that cost authorities £1 million.

Mar 25th, 2011

The ubiquitous, accessible-to-all Google Earth pictorial application was used by thieves to target copper cabling along the side of UK railway lines in a theft that cost £1 million, as reported by the UK Mail Online.

There are two interesting angles to this story: first, as attested to by evidence of video stills in the aforementioned report, it casts Google Earth in a great light as the largest critical-use IP surveillance application ever; and secondly, as a reminder that theft of precious metal materials by this method is only going to increase, as in another recent case, also in the UK, where thieves used Google Earth to target lead (Pb) roofs on Church of England buildings.

Cabling installation contractors, as always, may take note: “We have seen the significant disruption that metal theft causes to critical national infrastructure throughout the United Kingdom,” commented UK Home Office minister James Brokenshire.“That includes power and transport networks, with the stealing of live copper cable, which has resulted in death and serious injury for people involved.”

Full Story:Thieves use Google Earth to steal copper cabling costing railway companies £1 million (dailymail.co.uk)

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