Use invisible tape when testing at patch panels

Keeping track of every port when testing at high-density patch panels is often difficult. The approach for many is to write down each port on a pad of paper near the patch panel. In addition to being cumbersome, the pad of paper can cause confusion if one technician takes over for another and can`t tell the original technician`s 5s from 6s or 8s from 3s.

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Les Martin, Central Area Data Processing Cooperative

problem

Keeping track of every port when testing at high-density patch panels is often difficult. The approach for many is to write down each port on a pad of paper near the patch panel. In addition to being cumbersome, the pad of paper can cause confusion if one technician takes over for another and can`t tell the original technician`s 5s from 6s or 8s from 3s.

solution

Instead of trying to write down each port number as the circuit is certified, simply cover the numbers below each outlet with invisible tape. As each port is certified, color the number with a magic marker. When you use this method, one technician can pick up for another at the patch panel and know immediately which circuits have been certified and which have not.

procedure

1) Get a roll of invisible tape and a marker.

2) Use the invisible tape to cover each row of numbers on a high-density patch panel.

3) As you certify the performance of each circuit in the cabling system, color in the number below each port of the patch panel once that circuit`s performance is verified.

4) When you are finished testing the system, you can note the port numbers that were not verified or that you wish to note for any other reason. But you will not have an unwieldy list of numbers to deal with.

5) Once you have the information you need, remove the tape from the patch panel and discard it.

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Carefully place invisible tape over each row of numbers in a high-density patch panel.

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Noting that a circuit has been certified is easy with a standard marker.

Les Martin is a technical coordinator for Central Area Data Processing Cooperative (St. Peters, MO).

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