Innovations save Installers Time and Money

In response to the February 1999 technology feature (see "Innovations save installers time and money," page 29), I hope the illustration on page 29 was not an indication that you advocate cables lying on the ceiling grid. The Gopher Pole is a fast way to go a long way without taking out a lot of tiles; however, those cables must be supported every 5 feet, per the tia/eia-568a standard. The Sling-A-Line, pictured on page 32, says it`s the fastest way to run cables over false ceilings. Again, this

Todd R. Strothenke

bicsi-certified trainer

S&R Telephone and Data

Waukesha, WI

In response to the February 1999 technology feature (see "Innovations save installers time and money," page 29), I hope the illustration on page 29 was not an indication that you advocate cables lying on the ceiling grid. The Gopher Pole is a fast way to go a long way without taking out a lot of tiles; however, those cables must be supported every 5 feet, per the tia/eia-568a standard. The Sling-A-Line, pictured on page 32, says it`s the fastest way to run cables over false ceilings. Again, this implies what?

The author replies: Sincere thanks to Mr. Strothenke and Mr. McCrory for their responses and their concern. I did not intend to mislead cabling installers into believing that a ceiling grid is an acceptable support structure for cables.

The illustration on page 29 was intended to show the capability of the Gopher Pole, and to do so simply. The article focused on the Gopher Pole and other tools that help to install, not support, cables. The illustration in question also shows an enormous amount of headroom above the ceiling tiles?not what most installers find in the field, I?m sure. A true-to-life illustration would have shown a more-cramped environment above the ceiling, including a cable-support structure as well as other duct work and venting. I believe that such an illustration would have distracted readers from the focus?routing cable from one spot to another.

Finally, cable often is not put into a support structure until after it has been pulled from one point in a building to another. Trying to pull a bundle of cables through a support hook, for instance, can be difficult and can cause snagging.

That being said, Mr. Strothenke?s and Mr. McCrory?s message has come through loud and clear. In hindsight, a caveat within the caption beneath the illustration might have been the most appropriate place to address cable-support requirements.

More in Home
AV over Twisted-Pair
Sponsored
AV over Twisted-Pair