To the EDITOR

Cast portable label makers in the correct light...

Oct 1st, 2006

Cast portable label makers in the correct light

In the July issue, an article entitled “Evolving methods for tomorrow’s technology,” authored by Betsy Ziobron on behalf of Beast Cabling Systems, includes a statement that the company would like to clarify. Portable label makers, and other types of label makers, are an absolute necessity for the proper final labeling of a cabling installation per the TIA-606-A Administration Standard. The reference made to label makers in this article was solely in regard to the rough-in labeling process that installers use to code cables as they are being pulled.

For the installer, the very necessary process of rough-in labeling has two goals: speed and accuracy. In fact, a portable label maker helps to achieve those goals and is a great complement to the overall cable installation system. Many of today’s better labeling systems have significantly reduced the amount of time it takes to produce cable labels. These labels are smear-proof, stick extraordinarily well, and are 100% legible-greatly increasing the likelihood of correct identification. As a result, it is quite common to see these systems in use during the rough-in stage of cabling.

Greg Bramham
Vice president
Beast Cabling Systems

Change for change’s sake?

I have seen so many articles based on network convergence and how it is going to make the technician’s life easier. The world revolving around a single point-the IP network-may be like the old adage “keeping up with the Joneses.” If Big Business A does a complete forklift VoIP solution, then Big Business B needs to do the same, whether it will benefit them or not.

I work for a local county government that currently has a Nortel Option 81 phone switch that has been performing rock-solid. It has been suggested that we start a migration path toward VoIP, and we have been told that it will increase our employees’ productivity while costing the county less.

I am of the opinion that if something is working, why fix it with a system that is going to cost money to install, create more headaches to manage, and be more difficult to recover from an outage? It is not worth it to keep up with the Joneses.

Rick Harvey
Kings County Information Technology
Kings County, CA

Article on baluns hits home

The recent article about AV baluns (“AV baluns add value to copper cabling systems,” August 2006, p. 43) really hit home for me, as I have purchased and used them this year at different sites, including schools. I have been using baluns since the old System 36/38/AS/400 days when pulling and terminating twinax was a pain. In the 1980s and ’90s, I partnered with StarTek (before 3Com acquired them), installing UTP solutions for big AS/400s.

As time goes on, I am doing more and more high-end AV systems (high-def plasmas, LCDs, home theater, etc.). Currently, I am working at a $7 million house in Malibu, installing voice/data/video/HDTV/security cameras. We are putting in Category 6A in massive quantities, as well as quad-shield RG-6 and some Category 3 (for posterity). My only concern is that the family will ask for a TV somewhere that I have no cable, so I am loading up every outlet.

The magazine could not have been better than the August issue. I learn a lot from it and pass the information along to my customers, which provides more value to my business. Keep up the good work.

Bill Farhood, RCDD/NTS/OSP Specialist
BF Datacom Inc.
Marina del Rey, CA

(An article on one of BF Datacom’s projects appeared in CI&M’s October 2000 issue; Farhood appeared on the cover of that issue.-Ed.)

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