A high-definition touchdown for Michigan State stadium project

Replacing broadcast-quality cables that had been used for more than 20 years, installers and technicians recently got Michigan State University’s Spartan Stadium updated to the high-definition age, making it ready for next-generation audio and video football broadcasting over the airwaves of national networks.

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Replacing broadcast-quality cables that had been used for more than 20 years, installers and technicians recently got Michigan State University’s Spartan Stadium updated to the high-definition age, making it ready for next-generation audio and video football broadcasting over the airwaves of national networks.

“Everything’s changing over from standard definition to high definition, and we are one of the few university stadiums in the county to offer HD connectivity solutions,” says Rick Church, Michigan State’s director of sports broadcasting.

New audio/video cabling, including HDTV coax, and components from Gepco International (www.gepco.com), were key to the updgrade, and in addition, new Category 5 and fiber-optic cables were installed to relocate existing equipment to new locations. A new head end was established, and several new patch bay rooms were necessary to accommodate special needs interconnects.

The challenge for installers was to keep the stadium’s systems running during the various building events scheduled throughout the construction. Sound Engineering of Livonia, MI (www.soundeng.com), with assistance and direct supervision from Church, oversaw the multimedia cabling/ interconnect renovation.

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The TV broadcast area in Michigan State’s Spartan Stadium recently underwent an upgrade that saw installation of new Category 5 and fiber-optic cabling, plus several audio/video cables and components from Gepco International. All media replaced cabling that had been in use for the past 20 years.
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“On a typical Saturday game day, we could have anybody from ABC to ESPN pull up and set up all of their equipment,” says Church. “Every broadcast uses our cables for the transmission of audio and video, so it was important that we select a brand that would perform at the highest level.”

For the broadcast cable and connectivity, Church chose several products from Gepco, including RG59 HDTV coax, RG11 plenum triax, three types of plenum multi-pair audio cable, two types of single-pair audio cable, and Gep-Flex 12-pair cable. In addition, Church selected Gepco’s G37 DT12 multi-pin connectors and custom panels, as well as Neutrik (www. neutrik.com) XLRs and ADC (www.adc.com) audio and video patch panels.

Church liked the way Gepco’s cables “provide consistent, high-quality transmission. Broadcasters have been pleasantly surprised that the HDTV coax cable is available, and are happy to use it because it provides broadcasts with superior images.”

The media facilities upgrade was part of general refurbishing of portions of Spartan Stadium that included 24 luxury suites, 862 club seats, a new press box and TV broadcast area, and office space.

The TV broadcast area in Michigan State’s Spartan Stadium recently underwent an upgrade that saw installation of new Category 5 and fiber-optic cabling, plus several audio/video cables and components from Gepco International. All media replaced cabling that had been in use for the past 20 years.


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