Accommodating equipment cords

In the April 1998 issue of Cabling Installation & Maintenance, page 8, T. Kirschbaum responds to my Cabling Installer Tip`.

Jim Slaymon

USA Group

Indianapolis, IN

In the April 1998 issue of Cabling Installation & Maintenance, page 8, T. Kirschbaum responds to my Cabling Installer Tip`.

Mr. Kirschbaum`s response seems to indicate that he was upset to think that my tip was even published, let alone considered. He failed to see the entire picture. First, let me make him aware that this system works quite well in our company, where we move more than 2000 people a year, on average.

This tip was recommended for new construction only. In addition, we do not indiscriminately place the outlets; we strategically locate them within the office after getting an office layout. This way, the outlet is right where the desk will be placed. We do not go back and add new outlets to existing offices either. Like most companies, we don`t have the staff or time.

As far as the difference in cost between a 7- and a 10-foot patch cord, he is right: There isn`t a lot of difference in cost. But when you add it up over time it helps reduce costs. In our company, desks are generally not placed against a wall, as pictured. Usually one side of the desk is placed against the wall, leaving a cord exposed. He also mentions that draping a cord across the floor is typical, but I question whether it should be! We take pride in our neat installations.

In closing, Mr. Kirschbaum states that "installers end up dealing with situations very different from the ideal. Remember: It`s not a perfect world out here." How true! Like all published tips, some will work for you and some won`t. This one works well for us--I`m sorry it doesn`t for him.

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