Hitachi Cable Manchester to finish testing of 10-Gbit UTP cable

July 11, 2005 - Cable is being independently tested to the current 10-Gbit Ethernet proposed standard.

Jul 11th, 2005

Hitachi Cable Manchester will soon finish independent lab testing on its new high performance 10-Gbit, unshielded, twisted-pair (UTP) cable.

The cable, designed for 10-Gbit Ethernet transmission speeds, is being independently tested to the current 10-Gbit proposed standard, IEEE 802.3an, and is scheduled to be released in the next few weeks. The cable will utilize a patent pending dual-jacket construction that guarantees 10 Gbits/sec performance and is designed to permit easy installation and termination. The cable will be built at Hitachi's 300,000 square-foot facility located in Manchester, NH.

Steven Kenney, marketing manager for HCM, says HCM's approach to releasing new products may differ from its competitors.

"Only when we have proven that our new 10-Gbit cable exceeds the proposed 10 Gbits/sec standards will we make the product available," says Kenney. "Our cable will provide 10-Gbit Ethernet to beyond 100 meters and will also perform as designed independent of a specific connectivity partner. As a cable manufacturer, we want to give our customers the freedom to choose the connectivity manufacturer that they want and not, necessarily, change to accommodate a specific solutions' requirements."

Kenney says the new cable has been designed and built in response to the growing demand for high-performance communication cable. He says recent industry news indicated that network managers are more likely to embrace a high-performance cable, such as HCM's 10-Gbit cable, than ever before.

Kenney says that as the demand for Category 5e wanes and Category 6 installs steadily grow, the leap to cable designed for 10-Gbit Ethernet is a relatively small one. Industry news also indicated that, in fact, more than 15% of network managers would install 10-Gbit Ethernet copper cabling today.

Driving the need for higher-performance communication cabling is the ever-growing need for bandwidth, Kenney says. High bandwidth needs in industries such as financial, medical and scientific research require a cable infrastructure that can accommodate bandwidth hungry applications such as streaming video, file transfer, medical imaging and high-resolution graphics and images. Kenney says HCM's 10-Gbit cable was designed for that purpose.

HCM is based in Manchester, NH. For more information visit www.hcm.Hitachi.com.


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