Industry news updates

A study released this week by IDC (Framingham, MA; www.idc.com) says network processors are "on the verge of forever changing" the networking equipment industry

A study released this week by IDC (Framingham, MA; www.idc.com) says network processors are "on the verge of forever changing" the networking equipment industry. Network processors, the forecast says, will eventually displace other networking semiconductor components, and in the process increase revenues from less than $41 million last year to more than $560 million by 2003.

Yipes Communications (San Fancisco; www.yipes.com) has unveiled Yipes WAN, a secure, wide-area IP network service. Yipes WAN connects LANs to distant business locations at customer-selected speeds, with service level agreements guaranteeing less than 80 milliseconds of round-trip latency (nationwide). "Yipes is opening up a new market for LAN-to-LAN connectivity across the wide area," says Lawrence Gasman, president of Communications Industry Researchers. "Yipes' new service should prove highly valuable to customers who need secure, flexible and affordable data transport between regions."

Alcatel (Paris; www.alcatel.com) and IBM (Somers, NY; www.ibm.com) have agreed to integrate their information technology and communications expertise by offering advanced network solutions to carrier, ASP, and enterprise customers. The companies say they''ll focus their efforts on Internet Data Centers-technology hubs that link the IT infrastructure (IBM's expertise) with networking infrastructure and communication software (Alcatel's strength). Potential estimates for the Internet Data Center markets over the next three years could exceed $100 billion.

Signaling used by Echelon Corp.'s (Sunnyvale, CA; www.echelon.com) PLT-22 power line networking technology has been adopted as an open ANSI standard-ANSI/EA 709.2-A-2000 Control Network Powerline Channel Specification. Designed to send information between devices ranging from appliances to electric/water meters and security systems via a home's or building's power wiring, PLT-22 uses advanced DSP and error correction techniques to ensure reliable signaling.

Graybar (St. Louis; www.graybar.com) has added a branch in its Atlanta district by acquiring Ireland Electric Supply, an electrical distributor in Augusta, GA. The purchase agreement, which involves 18 employees and more than $7 million in annual sales, gives Graybar a location in a market in which it had sales coverage but no local presence.

SBC Communications (San Antonio; www.sbc.com) has introduced a DSL self-install kit designed to make it easier and faster for its customers to experience the benefits of high-speed Internet access. The self-install kit includes a DSL modem, filters, software, an instruction manual, and a network interface card. SBC says installation takes less than an hour. The company's basic DSL Internet service provides downstream connection speeds up to 1.5 Mbits/sec-50 times faster than a 28.8 Kbits/sec analog modem.

Aperto Networks (Milpitas, CA; www.apertonet.com), a fixed broadband wireless access systems developer, entered the market this week. The company's capabilities in the sub-11GHz wireless spectrum seek to help carriers reach millions of users who aren't broadband-serveable with DSL or cable modems. Reza Ahy is CEO and president; Alan Menezes is VP of marketing.

Also launching this week is Lobby7 (Boston; www.lobby7.com), a custom wireless application strategy and solutions firm founded by five MIT alumni with vast experience in wireless application development. Lobby7 says it will build innovative, tailored wireless solutions for the enterprise market that push the boundaries of the mobile realm.

Six communications and semiconductor companies have formed the Wireless DSL Consortium (www.wdslconsortium.com), in hopes of accelerating the deployment of broadband wireless access. Founding members are ADC, Conexant Systems, Gigabit Wireless, Intel, Nortel Networks, and Vyyo. Broadband wireless access is now in commercial trials, with both Sprint and WorldCom testing the technology in a number of U.S. markets.

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