Transition Networks unveils analog video copper-to-fiber media converters

Jan. 28, 2006 - Converters are designed to provide means to transport analog NTSC, PAL or SECAM video signals over multimode or singlemode fiber.

Transition Networks Inc. has unveiled its new analog video copper-to-fiber media converters.

These converters are designed to provide means to transport analog NTSC, PAL or SECAM video signals over multimode or singlemode fiber allowing security providers and administrators to utilize optical infrastructure for video surveillance and monitoring.

"A major trend in security installations is the cost-effective integration of fiber optic cabling with copper-based cameras, servers and monitors," says Bill Schultz, vice president of marketing at Transition Networks. "Transporting analog video over fiber optic cabling allows for extended surveillance reach and less noise and interference than can be obtained over copper infrastructure. We have also added automatic gain control on both the transmitter and the receiver to offer the customers better images without timely manual adjustments, a true customer benefit."

The video media converters are intended to be used in pairs with the TX converter transmitting an analog video signal from the coaxial output on the camera over optical fiber cabling to an optical video RX converter which then converts the signal back to an analog NTSC, PAL or SECAM video signal on the coax. The real-time, full-color video quality is maintained or improved with the Automatic Gain Control feature. The miniature size allows the transmitter to be mounted directly to the camera or wall-mounted nearby. The receiver comes in both chassis card and stand-alone versions offering different mounting options and the ability to remotely monitor the receiver via SNMP. For high-density applications the dual receive card provides users two receivers that occupy only one slot in the Point System Modular chassis.

Transition Networks is based in Minneapolis, MN. For more information visit www.transition.com.


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