Canada's Lakeridge Health taps IndigoVision for multi-site IP video surveillance

Lakeridge Health Corporation, a Canadian-based healthcare group, is using IndigoVision’s end-to-end IP video platform to migrate its standalone DVR analog video equipment to an integrated multi-site surveillance system.

Lakeridge Health Corporation, a Canadian-based healthcare group, is using IndigoVision’s end-to-end IP video platform to migrate its standalone DVR analog video equipment to an integrated multi-site surveillance system. By re-using much of the analog equipment, Lakeridge says it has managed to keep a great deal of its original investment, demonstrating the value in adopting a migration path using distributed IP video technology.

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“The choice of IP Video vendor was thus very important,” explains James Ramsey, the Manager for Security, Emergency Preparedness and Worksafe at Lakeridge Health, “Our IT team put incredible time and energy into creating a state of the art network infrastructure.”

Since 2007, 250 fixed and PTZ cameras have been added to the healthcare group's IP Video system across the 4 sites, including 144 cameras from the original system in the main Oshawa hospital complex. A further 46 cameras will be added over the next few months. Two of the other hospital sites are still using the existing DVR analog equipment, but they will also be migrating across to the IP Video system in the future.

As IndigoVision’s system is fully distributed any component can be located at any point on the network, including workstations running IndigoVision’s ‘Control Center’ Security Management Software. These workstations are used by operators to view and analyze both live and recorded video from any camera at any site. As ‘Control Center’ is licensed on an unrestricted basis within the cost of IndigoVision’s hardware, Lakeridge Health has been able to deploy multiple workstations across the group for no additional cost. In addition to the central monitoring facility at Oshawa, workstations are also located in various departments and at numerous Nurse Stations, where their access is limited to live view of local cameras.

“The ability to place video workstations in different departments has been of great benefit to us,” added Ramsey. “The Parking Services department located at Oshawa Hospital used to rely on an intercom to communicate with the other sites, now they can monitor and manage all of the group’s parking lots and unmanned gates from a single workstation. It’s also much easier to track missing equipment and locate wandering patients.”

Video is continuously recorded from all cameras on IndigoVision’s standalone Network Video Recorders (NVRs) for up to 45 days. Evidential quality video clips can be exported for police use in the event of an incident.

Future plans for the IP Video system include integration with the on-site Lenel access control system and deploying IndigoVision’s Video Wall software in the central monitoring facility. Using IndigoVision’s integration module, the access control system can be seamlessly integrated across the IP network, with an alarm in one system triggering events in the other. This leads to more efficient security management and quicker incident response. IndigoVision’s Video Wall software is based on ‘Control Center’ and allows professional fully-featured control room video walls to be built to any size.

Web: www.indigovision.com

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